J. Semicond. > Volume 38 > Issue 12 > Article Number: 124005

Design of a cylindrical LED substrate without radiator

Fan Tang and Zhenning Guo ,

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Abstract: To reduce the weight and production costs of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, we applied the principle of the chimney effect to design a cylindrical LED substrate without a radiator. We built a 3D model by using Solidworks software and applied the flow simulation plug-in to conduct model simulation, thereby optimizing the heat source distribution and substrate thickness. The results indicate that the design achieved optimal cooling with a substrate with an upper extension length of 35 mm, a lower extension length of 8 mm, and a thickness of 1 mm. For a substrate of those dimensions, the highest LED chip temperature was 64.78 °C, the weight of the substrate was 35.09 g, and Rjb = 7.00 K/W. If the substrate is powered at 8, 10, and 12 W, its temperature meets LED safety requirements. In physical tests, the highest temperature for a physical 8 W cylindrical LED substrate was 66 °C, which differed by only 1.22 °C from the simulation results, verifying the validity of the simulation. The designed cylindrical LED substrate can be used in high-power LED lamps that do not require radiators. This design is not only excellent for heat dissipation, but also for its low weight, low cost, and simplicity of manufacture.

Key words: cylindrical substratehighest temperatureLEDwithout radiatorchimney effect

Abstract: To reduce the weight and production costs of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps, we applied the principle of the chimney effect to design a cylindrical LED substrate without a radiator. We built a 3D model by using Solidworks software and applied the flow simulation plug-in to conduct model simulation, thereby optimizing the heat source distribution and substrate thickness. The results indicate that the design achieved optimal cooling with a substrate with an upper extension length of 35 mm, a lower extension length of 8 mm, and a thickness of 1 mm. For a substrate of those dimensions, the highest LED chip temperature was 64.78 °C, the weight of the substrate was 35.09 g, and Rjb = 7.00 K/W. If the substrate is powered at 8, 10, and 12 W, its temperature meets LED safety requirements. In physical tests, the highest temperature for a physical 8 W cylindrical LED substrate was 66 °C, which differed by only 1.22 °C from the simulation results, verifying the validity of the simulation. The designed cylindrical LED substrate can be used in high-power LED lamps that do not require radiators. This design is not only excellent for heat dissipation, but also for its low weight, low cost, and simplicity of manufacture.

Key words: cylindrical substratehighest temperatureLEDwithout radiatorchimney effect



References:

[1]

Lin Y C, Nguyen T, Zhou Y. Materials challenges and solutions for the packaging of high power LEDs[J]. International Microsystems, Packing, Assembly Conference, Taiwan, China, 2006: 177.

[2]

Arik M, Petroski J, Weaver S. Thermal challenges in the future generation solid state lighting applications: light emitting diodes[J]. IEEE Intersociety Conf, Thermal Phenomena, Hawaii, 2002: 113.

[3]

Li J H. Thermal design and simulation of LED lamps. Zhejiang: Hangzhou Dianzi University, 2011

[4]

He F, Chen Q H, Liu J F. Thermal analysis of high mast integrated LED Lamp with new heatsink structure of laminated pure aluminum plate[J]. Chin J Lumin, 2014, 35: 743.

[5]

Wang L, Wu K, Yu Y B. Study on LED array heat radiator improvement under natural convection[J]. J Optoelectron•Laser, 2011, 22: 338.

[6]

Xiang J H, Zhang C L, Chen S. Numerical optimization of phase-change radiator for high-power LED[J]. J Guangzhou Univ (Nat Sci Ed), 2015, 14: 61.

[7]

Zhu P. The enhancement of heat dissipation of high power LED lamp with chimney effect[J]. Dalian Univ Technol, 2014: 20.

[8]

Hu M Y, Wu Y P, Yang Z R. Thermal design of high power plate LED COB lighting source[J]. Electron Process Technol, 2015, 36: 63.

[9]

Li J, Ji S T, Liu Y. Analysis on the stack effect of cooling device of electronic components[J]. Electron Pack, 2011, 11: 36.

[10]

Liu J, Liu J F, Chen Q H. Thermal management of novel 12W LED bulb for the substitution of 100 W incandescent bulb[J]. Chin J Lumin, 2014, 35: 86.

[1]

Lin Y C, Nguyen T, Zhou Y. Materials challenges and solutions for the packaging of high power LEDs[J]. International Microsystems, Packing, Assembly Conference, Taiwan, China, 2006: 177.

[2]

Arik M, Petroski J, Weaver S. Thermal challenges in the future generation solid state lighting applications: light emitting diodes[J]. IEEE Intersociety Conf, Thermal Phenomena, Hawaii, 2002: 113.

[3]

Li J H. Thermal design and simulation of LED lamps. Zhejiang: Hangzhou Dianzi University, 2011

[4]

He F, Chen Q H, Liu J F. Thermal analysis of high mast integrated LED Lamp with new heatsink structure of laminated pure aluminum plate[J]. Chin J Lumin, 2014, 35: 743.

[5]

Wang L, Wu K, Yu Y B. Study on LED array heat radiator improvement under natural convection[J]. J Optoelectron•Laser, 2011, 22: 338.

[6]

Xiang J H, Zhang C L, Chen S. Numerical optimization of phase-change radiator for high-power LED[J]. J Guangzhou Univ (Nat Sci Ed), 2015, 14: 61.

[7]

Zhu P. The enhancement of heat dissipation of high power LED lamp with chimney effect[J]. Dalian Univ Technol, 2014: 20.

[8]

Hu M Y, Wu Y P, Yang Z R. Thermal design of high power plate LED COB lighting source[J]. Electron Process Technol, 2015, 36: 63.

[9]

Li J, Ji S T, Liu Y. Analysis on the stack effect of cooling device of electronic components[J]. Electron Pack, 2011, 11: 36.

[10]

Liu J, Liu J F, Chen Q H. Thermal management of novel 12W LED bulb for the substitution of 100 W incandescent bulb[J]. Chin J Lumin, 2014, 35: 86.

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F Tang, Z N Guo. Design of a cylindrical LED substrate without radiator[J]. J. Semicond., 2017, 38(12): 124005. doi: 10.1088/1674-4926/38/12/124005.

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History

Manuscript received: 12 April 2017 Manuscript revised: 22 June 2017 Online: Corrected proof: 15 November 2017 Published: 01 December 2017

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